<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Well I did not say that, itís not my blog.<div><br></div><div>But as far as I know itís really simple:</div><div><br></div><div>copyright is your right as the *author*</div><div><br></div><div>Itís attributed to you by default (by terms of the Berner Convention)</div><div><br></div><div>So if you release something under a copyleft license, or into the Public Domain, you still have copyright.</div><div><br></div><div>Meaning you could at some point make a new version, which you license differently.</div><div><br></div><div>Now, if you take public domain art work (which is free to use), and do your own thing with it, then your *modifications* to the original automatically have your copyright.</div><div><br></div><div>That means, that you can choose to reserve all rights to your version which uses public domain imagery.</div><div><br></div><div>That does not keep anyone from using the original imagery.</div><div><br></div><div>But if Iím not mistaken, thatís the difference between distributing something public domain, and distributing copyleft.</div><div><br></div><div>When distributing copyleft, you require adaptations to be released under the same licence as the original.</div><div><br></div><div>So, Public Domain is more similar to a MIT/X11 style license, and Copyleft is more similar to the GPL.</div><div><br></div><div>I am not a lawyer but this is my understanding?</div><div><br></div><div>E</div><div><div><div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Op 31 mrt 2009, om 09:45 heeft chovynz het volgende geschreven:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Mar 31, 2009 at 8:23 PM, Schrijver <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:eric@authoritism.net">eric@authoritism.net</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"> Firstly, everybody congratulations with the release!<br> ...</blockquote><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><br> PS<br> Apologies btw that regarding foss matters my focus is so erratic; I<br> did not get back to these last things about copyright but I did read<br> the other reactions, thanks all! In the specific case the guy did<br> actually alter the license in retrospect, I later found outÖ <a href="http://www.roysac.com/blog/2008/08/copyleft-vs-public-domain.html" target="_blank">http://www.roysac.com/blog/2008/08/copyleft-vs-public-domain.html</a><br> Now, that specific case is not so interesting, but it is really<br> interesting to read your reactions on the matter.<br> </blockquote><div><br> I learned something. This concerns me somewhat.  <br>Did you just say public domain things CAN be copyrighted by someone?<br>Public domain is not protected from being copyrighted?<br>I read the blog. <br><br>I think we might need a legal copyright lawyer to comment. Or maybe just point me in the right direction if one has already answered something like this.<br> </div></div><br> -- <br>Cheers<br>Chovynz<br> _______________________________________________<br>clipart mailing list<br><a href="mailto:clipart@lists.freedesktop.org">clipart@lists.freedesktop.org</a><br>http://lists.freedesktop.org/mailman/listinfo/clipart<br></blockquote></div><br></div></div></body></html>